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Review of Biblical Literature Blog

King and Messiah as Son of God: Divine, Human, and Angelic Messianic Figures in Biblical and Related Literature
Collins, Adela Yarbro and John J. Collins

Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008 pp. xiv + 261. $28.00


Description: This book traces the history of the idea that the king and later the messiah is Son of God, from its origins in ancient Near Eastern royal ideology to its Christian appropriation in the New Testament. Both highly regarded scholars, Adela Yarbro Collins and John J. Collins argue that Jesus was called “the Son of God” precisely because he was believed to be the messianic king. This belief and tradition, they contend, led to the identification of Jesus as preexistent, personified Wisdom, or a heavenly being in the New Testament canon. However, the titles Jesus is given are historical titles tracing back to Egyptian New Kingdom ideology. Therefore the title “Son of God” is likely solely messianic and not literal. King and Messiah as Son of God is distinctive in its range, spanning both Testaments and informed by ancient Near Eastern literature and Jewish noncanonical literature.

Subjects: Methods, Theological Approaches, Biblical Theology, New Testament Theology


Review by Stephen Reed
Read the Review
Published 7/24/2009
Citation: Stephen Reed, review of Adela Yarbro Collins and John J. Collins, King and Messiah as Son of God: Divine, Human, and Angelic Messianic Figures in Biblical and Related Literature, Review of Biblical Literature [http://www.bookreviews.org] (2009).


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