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Review of Biblical Literature Blog

Marcion and Luke-Acts: A Defining Struggle
Tyson, Joseph†B.

Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2006 pp. xii + 192. $39.95


Description: Building on recent scholarship that argues for a second-century date for the book of Acts, Marcion and Luke-Acts explores the probable context for the authorship not only of Acts but also of the canonical Gospel of Luke. Joseph B. Tyson proposes that both Acts and the final version of the Gospel of Luke were published at the time when Marcion of Pontus was beginning to proclaim his version of the Christian gospel, in the years 120Ė125 C.E. He suggests that although the author was subject to various influences, a prominent motivation was the need to provide the church with writings that would serve in its fight against Marcionite Christianity. Tyson concludes that the author of Acts made use of an earlier version of the Gospel of Luke and produced canonical Luke by adding, among other things, birth accounts and postresurrection narratives of Jesus.

Subjects: Bible, New Testament, Synoptic Gospels, Luke, Acts, Literature

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Review by Dieter T. Roth
Published 5/31/2008
Citation: Dieter T. Roth, review of Joseph B. Tyson, Marcion and Luke-Acts: A Defining Struggle, Review of Biblical Literature [http://www.bookreviews.org] (2008).


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